04 May 2009


May 5th marks the third week since "GJ", the first chick, hatched. All three chicks are growing like weeds. This is most likely due to the male's proficient fishing skills. He definitely has a knack for catching flounder. I believe the count up to today is eleven flounder. You can’t really explain what the fish looks like underwater until you actually see it. Basically, you are looking for something on the bottom that just doesn’t look right. It could be rock covered up by sand, or maybe a random depression … but every now and then it’s a fish. The osprey, like other daytime hunting (diurnal) birds of prey has excellent vision. We've probably all used the term "eagle eye" to denote someone with keen vision. The osprey's vision is one of his most important senses for hunting and reacting to danger. Like humans, an osprey focuses on objects through binocular vision (using both eyes to see). Unlike birds that have one on each side of their head and use each in isolation, the osprey's eyes are facing forward. This enables him to have great depth perception as he hovers searching for prey. Ospreys have more sensory cells in their eyes and can see objects at a distance up to three times better than a human. They are also able to discern colors. This helps to discern prey, and aids in reproductive behavior.

As a lot of commentators have noted, the chicks seem to be hanging by the outer edge of the nest. Disconcerting for all of us, but I believe the female has it under control. She doesn't seemed stressed by their proximity to the nests edge. Thank goodness she can't feel our anxiety. Upon this writing she is feeding them again. They just ate an hour and a half ago. To have that metabolism. 8)

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Tuned in to watch an AM feed. Breakfast was meager. The oldest chick aggressively attacked the youngest when it tried to approach.
The youngest retreated out of attack range. The two oldest are sleeping in head to butt fashion--youngest is almost out of camera view.
I sure hope the male keeps on bringing a good food supply!!!

moderator said...

The osprey gallery has been updated. Link is located under the "Bird Links" section of the main blog page.

Realist said...

The photos are wonderful...in fact, the entire website is a rare treat! Thanks again to all who have made it possible for us to have this "insiders" experience!

moderator said...

Realist....Thank you for your comments. Broadcasting the cam and blog to our viewers has been gratifying for all of us at Palmetto Electric. It's been fun to watch the osprey family prosper with such a close-up view.

Anonymous said...

What a wonderful closeup!! The chicks are still in the middle of the nest. Hurray!
Yes, thank you & Palmetto Electric for giving us the opportunity to see into the lives of these ospreys. Raptors are so fascinating. What beautiful birds.
Mary Pat

Anonymous said...

That must be one heck of a view on that side of the nest.. It was amazing last night how she protected them during that early storm. Thank you PE for the shots and the camera. You guys do a great job..

Katt

moderator said...

Thanks Katt for your comment. The beach is located about two miles behind the camera.

Anonymous said...

The youngest chick tried to approach for food but the oldest put a stop to that, resulting in the young one to ball up.
Rechecked the cam view and the young one got up and is trying to get some food...success for a short while. The oldest chick attacked again and the young one is balled up again. I'm hoping the oldest will have a system overload and waddle away so that the others can can have a chance.

Anonymous said...

Looks like the aggression level is stepping up.
Will the youngest chick make it?

Realist said...

In views at this time, one can see how well youngest chick is doing despite the bullying of first hatched, in particular. S/he is really quite large for a runt, at this stage in the game. Mother appears to make certain youngest is well fed.

At Connecticut Audubon nest last spring and summer, runt (4th of 4) was very small and never really caught up in size to older three -but fledged and migrated. Perhaps s/he is male, therefore, slightly smaller. Just some random thoughts on the situation!

Anonymous said...

raptors have fascinated me for years.....always a thrill to see them reappear on the 278 bridge. thank you, palmetto electric, for giving us this wonderful opportunity. the real heros are mom and dad.....great parents. hope the little one makes it!