22 May 2009

The tropical fetch of moisture continues on though we do have a reprive at the moment. The ospreys are drying out and soaking up as much sun as they can before the rain returns. The male brought in a flounder that was large enough that the two chicks and female could not completely finish it with their first attempt. It appears MG has learned to use his/her mother as a barrier from GJ so he/she can eat without being pecked.

The chicks have been actively stretching and flapping their wings and sleeping. Probably enjoying being dry for a change.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

i'm so sad about the death of our chick and didn't realize how emotionally invested i was in the survival and development of the brood. thank you moderator for your continued comments on life in the nest..i look forward to your reports, it has be a wonderful learning experience. all those involved at palmetto electric should be commended for a fine job.

Anonymous said...

Do the chicks make similar calls as the adults, and can you distinguish between the vocals? I hope the older more aggressive chick doesn't make another kill, but it sounds as though it is quite belligerant to its sibling(s). Glad some fish finally arrived at the nest.

moderator said...

I'm not sure about the calls the chicks may make. Maybe some of our commentators can elaborate on that topic.

Today was the first day in about a week that it did not rain and nor did we have gale force winds.

The male brought in two flounder today so the surrounding waters were much easier to fish.

Realist said...

Can we fairly conclude that the aggressive pecking of the GJ, the oldest chick, contributed to the death of DS? Not trying to place blame; simply trying to understand better how survival of the fittest works in the bird world.

Perhaps, and I do mean perhaps because we'll never really know, DS was weakened by the aggression toward him, and the unfavorable weather pattern tipped the scale.

All in all, we have learned first hand how tenuous the odds for survival are for osprey chicks.

Realist said...

Gruesome question, Iimply know, but did osprey family eat (to be blunt) DS? All I see are remnants of feathers in the nest.

Anyone know differently?

Thank you for reading my blunt questions. Simply attempting to understand the ways of nature a bit better.

Anonymous said...

Just my thoughts...the body of DS has deteriorated to not much more than feathers. I think ospreys stick to fish, and wouldn't eat anything, even fish, that had been dead for several days.

Vivian

moderator said...

Their diet consists almost entirely of fish (≥99% of prey items). Though ospreys eat mostly fish, they have occasionally been seen eating other things, including birds, snakes, voles, squirrels, muskrats, salamanders, conchs when fish can not be found. Reports of ospreys feeding on carrion are rare.

I've noticed the osprey stepping over and on top of the dead chick's body while moving about the nest so I feel quite confident that they are not eating DS.

jazzel26 said...

I'll be blunt, one word answer. Flies. Also the wind will take care of the feathers, the bones are so small they will become part of the nest.

More could have been learned by removing the remains and examining them.

Linda

Realist said...

Thank you for your replies. Have learned a lot. Not the most cheerful subject, I know, but appreciate your input very much.

Anonymous said...

I can't believe I see shadows from the sunshine on the osprey cam this morning! This might be the week that our little chicks start trying to use their wings. They sure look like they're big enough. Mama and Papa osprey have done a good job.

Vivian