14 June 2009

Now that both GJ and MG have fledged, fishing skills are the next lesson. By instinct, the juvenile osprey will dive for fish. It takes a few months before the juvenile osprey are as proficient at hunting fish as their parents. Neither parent "teach" the juveniles to catch fish. Now that GJ and MG can fly the parents will feed them less to encourage them to take care of themselves.

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

It has been a wonderful few months watching the nest from the first egg to the last fledging. I will miss the family. Again, many thanks to everyone at Palmetto Electric for allowing us to go along for the ride.

Realist said...

Well, I'm not going anywhere until chicks take off for southern parts unknown for winter hiatus. Want to know how long they stick around before joining the wind currents on high!

Anonymous said...

I agree with Realist. I'll keep watching until mama, papa and two young osprey leave the nest for their long trip south. These four months have been terrific, thanks to you folks at Palmetto Electric!

Vivian

moderator said...

The osprey usually hang around until mid August to mid September. The couple defends their nest from intruders from this stage on until they leave for Central or South America. This is almost certain because nests are used by the same pair for many years, and represent a significant investment of time and energy by that pair.

The young birds will not travel with their parents. They will begin their own migration south, prodded by instinct and guided by an internal compass. Unlike, their parents they will not return north with the spring, but will spend a full year and a half in the Central or South America, where they acquire their adult plumage and their eyes, which blaze orange now, will fade to the adult yellow over the next year. The juevenile osprey will wait until the spring of their third year to return to the north. Often enough they will return to the same neighborhood they were born in.

toni said...

I was just thinking, it would be fun to get together with you all at PE and the bloggers here in Hilton Head just to celebrate these Ospreys. Perhaps meet somewhere for a glass of wine. It has been such fun and it would be great to meet those of you at PE who have done such a great job.
Toni

Anonymous said...

What a great idea, Toni. I live in the Atlanta area and have a condo on Hilton Head and would love to be there when the group meets. I wonder if Palmetto Electric would go along with such an idea?

Vivian

Carol said...

Any idea how old Mom and Dad are? What happens if one dies? Will they seek another mate? How do you know that it is the same pair coming back to the nest each year? Many more questions. We need a get-together to celebrate our adopted family and wish them a bon voyage. Count me in.

moderator said...

Not quite sure how old mom and dad are as they appeared on the nest two years ago. We are thinking they may be a young couple because last year they left the nest unattended during severe rain/lightning storms, which they did not do this year. This year they appeared more mature and calm. The pair that occupied the nest three years ago, Ollie and Olivia, were displaced by this current pair, which is not yet named.

If one of the osprey couple happens to die the remaining osprey is most likely to obtain a new mate.

Adult ospreys may be identified in the variation of pattern markings in their head and breast (bib). The markings that Ollie and Olivia had are different then this current pair. Plumage markings can change slightly over the years, but still allow for individual identification.

Carol said...

There appears to be blood on the base of the pole on the side of the nest. I don't remember seeing that red there before. Has there been an accident or an unwanted intruder?

moderator said...

Carol,

No it is not blood, The communications tower is painted red so no need for concern. Both parents and the two juveniles are doing just fine. In fact all four were just on the nest about fifteen minutes ago. The female is bringing in more nest material and sprucing up the joint. So they may have moved sticks, moss, etc. exposing part of the tower which is red.

There was an intruder osprey on the nest when the female returned with a fish. The two chicks seemed unfazed by the intruder, but the mother was quite annoyed. She quickly pushed the unknown osprey off the nest with her talons extended then later began calling out most likely telling the intruder to stay away. The territorial fight for the nest has begun.

jazzel26 said...

Great to see this nest has fledged two healthy ospreys!
This has been a very reliable cam, the moderators have been wonderful with updates and prompt responses to viewers questions and concerns. You should be very proud.

I was surprised you didn't have the chicks banded. Will you be arranging banding for next seasons chicks?

Linda

moderator said...

Hey Linda,

Thank you for your comments. We never discussed having the chicks banded. We're not sure who around here could do that. They would have to be certified to climb the communications tower as well as have experience with raptors.

Anonymous said...

I don't think I'd want to be climbing up that tower to try to band the chicks with the adult osprey anywhere near. Those talons look fierce and I wouldn't want them aimed at me.

Thanks, Moderator, for the information about the young staying in Central/South America for a year and a half to mature. When they leave the nest, they really leave!

Vivian

Anonymous said...

Cam operator--Do you feel like mama osprey was sending you a signal? That look was intense.

Vivian

moderator said...

Could be Vivian! 8)

It's possible one of the juveniles is on top of the camera. Unfortunately the sun is pointing at our view so the shadow is behind us.

Anonymous said...

The Woods Hole, Mass., site is really fun to watch now that the two chicks are big enough to see moving around the nest.

http://128.128.32.108/view/view.shtml

The site was down for a couple of days, but is back up with great video.

Vivian

Anonymous said...

I have also enjoyed watching the osprey's and checking in daily - I had come across the site late last year and set up a reminder to check it again this year early. Thanks to everyone at PE involved in the project - my kids and sister's family also enjoyed the progression.

See you next year!
Linda

Anonymous said...

Awe inspiring site. Was there not a third chick at one time? Do you know what happened to it...or did I count wrong?

Thank you for making it possible for us to witness this.

moderator said...

There was a third chick, DS, which died the fifth week. We don't know what happened to him/her. We had 15 to 17 straight days of rain prior to the death of DS and it could be possible he/she became ill during that time or it could be something else. Unfortunately we will never know.