22 February 2011

The young male on the platform seemed a bit agitated this morning around 7:30 flapping his wings and looking around. This may be the beginning of competition for the nest. Time will tell with that.

The young male continues to bring spanish moss, sticks, and pine cones to the platform increasing the depth and width of the nest.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

Nice to see the progress on the nest. Looks to me like they to bring more sticks for the foundation of the nest. The male was just on the nest.
Mary Pat :)

Anonymous said...

10:07am Osprey on the nest. Don't know if male or female but so good to them there.
Mary Pat:)

Anonymous said...

Nice closeup of the osprey on the nest this morning. Looks like s/he is working hard to get the nest ready. I'm guessing there is still a mate around helping? Let's hope they can complete the job!

Vivian

moderator said...

Hey Vivian,

That was the male working hard on the nest this morning. There are a few sticks that he can't quite get positioned where he wants them. He snapped a few of the branches so they are not poking him as he goes about the nest. Quite fun to watch him work.

I haven't seen the female yet this morning or yesterday for that matter. It appeared to us that he was looking up at another bird flying about so it may have been her. He did not seem agitated with the other bird.

Carol said...

Is it true that the female only has the random dark chest feathers? What are other ways to tell male from female?

Carol said...

Osprey on nest 2:30 p.m. 2/24.

moderator said...

Hey Carol,

Large (approximately 1,400 to 2,000 g body mass), long-winged (150 to 180 cm wingspan) raptor with dark chocolate-brown back and upper wing coverts, mostly white breast (some speckling) and belly, white crown and forehead, and dark line through eye. Caribbean subspecies (P. h. ridgwayi) appears mostly white-headed and white-breasted (and often paler brown on back); North American individuals less so. Ospreys breeding in Mexico much like Caribbean birds, with breasts and crowns almost entirely white, also with white underwing coverts; females slightly but not significantly darker than males in both these populations, so sexes not reliably distinguished. In all populations, iris of adult yellow; cere and legs pale blue-gray. Speckled brown necklace on breast of female (and some males).

Among Ospreys, sexual differences in plumage and size confuse the issue of geographic variation. Within populations, females average about 15–20% larger in body mass than males, and 5–10% longer in wing, tail, claw, and bill length. In addition, females tend to have fuller, darker breast-bands and darker heads than males, although this varies among populations.

Anonymous said...

I missed the closeup. Have you posted pics yet? Lots of moss on the nest. Has anyone seen them mating?
Mary Pat :)

moderator said...

Mary Pat,

I just started today to gather the photos and get them ready for the web. It will probably be next week that I'll get them posted.

moderator said...

Oops...Yes the male and female has been spotted mating. I've noticed twice so far.

Carol said...

Osprey on nest,4:18 p.m. 2/24

Carol said...

Osprey on nest 4:56 p.m. 2/24

Carol said...

ty Mod.for the descriptions. It's going to take awhile for me to get them straight.

Anonymous said...

To moderator

Would it be possible if someone could go up to (at least) put down the first layer of nesting material?

Wouldn't that encourage the ospreys to bring in more twigs et al?

Carol said...

Osprey on nest 9:59 a.m. 2/25.