21 April 2011

It's almost time for our pair, Bea and Jasper's, eggs to hatch. Incubation periods range from 5 - 6 weeks and next Friday, April 29th is the 35th day since the first egg was laid. Because the eggs are laid a few days apart, they also hatch in the order that they were laid - a few days apart. Chicks that hatch first are usually bigger and dominate over their younger siblings. If enough food cannot be supplied to all the chicks, the smallest chicks may not get enough to eat and die. This is called brood reduction.

Jasper will definitely be busy bringing in more and bigger fish to feed all the hungry little mouths.

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

4:36 to 4:40 --

She was clutching the right egg with both feet (sorry for the possibly imprecise term) and may have been pecking at it?

Then he delivered small fish, then they exchanged places?

Peter

moderator said...

Ospreys often use their feet and beaks to turn eggs, which she may have been doing. I wasn't watching the cam at the time.

Both male and female share incubating duties, with the female taking the bulk of the task.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for all the updates moderators...A+ Job :)

Today is Earth Day 2011(!)
Everyone can do their part for Earth Day by following the Three Rs: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.

Beth/Oh

Anonymous said...

The eggs seem to have been exposed more in the recent days. Is it hot there, or does the chick in the oldest egg start to "vibrate" (for lack of a better word) in the egg before she/he is ready to come out, thus prompting Momma to check things out?

Peter

moderator said...

Hey Peter,

I noticed the same thing today. The female was very unsettled. She kept getting up and checking on the eggs. I'm not sure if the eggs "vibrate" or not. I'm sure they know that they will be hatching soon. Friday begins the 35th day when the first eggs could possibly hatch.

It has been warm here - mid to upper 80's. Hopefully we'll have three healthy chicks within a little over a weeks time.

Anonymous said...

8:23 -- is that a smaller bird with a white head in the foreground? Or a few dislodged feathers from the left wing?

moderator said...

No small bird on the nest, it's just spanish moss and sticks with lichen, a fungus.

Realist said...

Watching closely with great anticipation. Wow, upper 80's! Great weather for newly-hatched chicks. Hoping storms stay away for awhile.

moderator said...

We're due for storms on Thursday, hopefully before the first chick hatches.

Carol said...

Eagle eggs 'pip' for about 30 hours. Is it about the same for osprey or perhaps a few hours less? Also, eagles can hear the chick inside the egg peeping as it tries to break thru the shell. The mother not turn an egg that is pippint as the chick will be breathing thru the hole it is making in the shell.

moderator said...

When a chick is ready to hatch, it will pierce it's air sac inside the shell and begin breathing air. The chick will use it's egg tooth, which is at the tip of is beak, to break the shell to free itself. The chick will make chirping noises which the parent will hear.

The hatching process could take 24 hours or more due to the chick positioning itself within the egg trying to break the shell and adjusting to breathing air. This process is very tiring for the chick.

birdgirl said...

Could we have a hatching tomorrow, the same day as the BIG WEDDING? Lots of us will be watching both events!

Vivian

moderator said...

It's very possible. Tomorrow is the 35th day since the first egg was laid.

Anonymous said...

12:08 -- She is off the eggs, and the one in front on the right looks different?

Peter

moderator said...

At 3:24pm the three eegs are still there. No chick yet.

Anonymous said...

She is sticking with it. We will see some action soon. I think she knows her tough work is ahead of her.

Vivian

Anonymous said...

Have been out of touch since early April but now am back online and eagerly awaiting the new arrivals!

Has Jasper been a good provider?
DB

moderator said...

Yes he has. He'll have to bring in more fish once they have little mouths to feed.